Some Updated Guidance On Valuable Cosmetic Acupuncture Alicante Plans

Cosmetic Acupuncture

Modern Acupuncture combines a healing form that has been validated by thousands of years of practice with a modern, clean and spa-like environment to provide guests with a peaceful sanctuary that they can make part of their regular routine. “We are very excited to bring the first DFW Modern Acupuncture to Dallas,” said Bruce McGovern, Modern Acupuncture’s franchisee and owner of the Addison Walk location. “The benefits of acupuncture are truly unprecedented, helping with things like chronic or acute pain, digestion, migraines, stress, insomnia and much more. Modern Acupuncture has also introduced cosmetic acupuncture as a very effective alternative to less natural solutions to treat fine lines and wrinkles. We look forward to making lives better in DFW through Modern Acupuncture.” Modern Acupuncture offers an enhanced acupuncture experience that utilizes needle therapy on nodes to increase blood flow, but unlike traditional acupuncture, does not require the removal of any clothing to access full-body health. A visit to Modern Acupuncture feels like a relaxing retreat, where guests can unwind and possibly even fall asleep, zoning out to peaceful music all while experiencing the healing and/or cosmetic benefits of acupuncture. Sessions are typically 30 minutes or less, and walk-ins are welcome. Upon entering Modern Acupuncture, guests are greeted by simplistic yet contemporary decor with calming colors and natural wood elements, sending them into an instant state of tranquility. After a customized consultation with a Modern Acupuncture Zen Advisor, guests are taken back to the Zen Den, a relaxing retreat outfitted with soundproof insulation, lounge-style recliners, calming sounds and cool earthtones, ensuring a multi-sensory experience while essential or cosmetic acupuncture services are delivered.

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